The student news site of A. C. Reynolds High School.

Cedar Cliff News

Animal Testing

Mandy Bishop, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






 

When picking out which brand of shampoo to buy, is animal testing ever a deal breaker? Every year in the U.S. “over 100 million animals are burned, crippled, poisoned, and abused” due to the testing of products and medicines for human consumption (PETA). Animal testing is an unpleasant and upsetting procedure that many wish to avoid the thought of, yet it is still the destiny of numerous innocent animals. Some of these animals include the more stereotypical “lab rats”: mice, rats, guinea pigs, frogs, and rabbits; but labs also often use cats, dogs, pigs, birds and monkeys.

Procedures are classified as sub-threshold, mild, moderate, severe or non-recovery; which can range from injections to organ transplants to the breeding of genetically modified animals.  

Although many animals are born into a death sentence for their sole purpose to test products, “about 92% of experimental drugs that are safe and effective in animals fail in human clinical trials because they are too dangerous or don’t work” (PETA). At this point one may ask “is animal testing even worth it?” Agriculture/ Horticulture teacher Mr. Kuster mentions that “some testing is humane,” and that companies are working towards finding solutions such as “reducing the number of animals tested for a single product and replacing live animal tests with human blood samples or fake skin”. He also differentiates between a farmer who “slaughter livestock for food, wool, meat, leather, suede or some item humans use is done as humanely as possible” on the contrary of the corporate procedures which restricts the animals and forces the animal to observe other animals being abused.

Safer and more humane alternatives have been created for the sake of the animals. Artificial human skin technology has given companies a more effective test and an option that senior Sophie Pruett describes as being “more compliant with [her] ethical beliefs and makes [her] more hopeful that animal testing could be eliminated in the future”.

Ways individuals can become involved with preventing animal testing is by checking labels of products or becoming aware of the companies that implement animal testing into their research. Senior Laurel Sales mentions that “[she] uses TRESemme shampoo every day and had no idea they test on animals”. Laurel stated that she was going to “tell her mom right away,” which is another preventative action individuals can take to educate others about the damaging effects of animal testing. So at the next shopping trip, keep in mind how that bottle of sunscreen became safe for human use, and who performed the real research behind the scenes.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Animal Testing

    News

    The Philosophy of an Apple

  • Animal Testing

    News

    Politically Active Teens

  • Animal Testing

    Opinion

    Modern Mormonism

  • Animal Testing

    News

    To Bee, or Not to Bee

  • Animal Testing

    Arts and Entertainment

    Summer Recipes!

  • Animal Testing

    Arts and Entertainment

    Art School Budget

  • Animal Testing

    Arts and Entertainment

    Travel on a budget

  • Animal Testing

    News

    North Carolina #1 in ISS Rates

  • Animal Testing

    Showcase

    City Council Approves JBL Turf Investment, Amid Cancer Concerns

  • Animal Testing

    Features

    Teacher spotlight: Mrs.Brown

The student news site of A. C. Reynolds High School.
Animal Testing